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The Largs War Memorial - The Great War

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The Largs War Memorial
Rottnest Island Cemetery

The Largs War Memorial
 
The Fallen of the Great War
1914 - 1918
 

 
Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay
down his life for his friends.
 
John, Chapter 15, verse 13
(King James Bible)

MEMORIAL PLAQUE No. 1
 
(East facing)
 

1ww1.jpg

Private George ALEXANDER
 
 
Private Dan ALLAN
 
 
Private W. N. S. ALLAN
 
 
Private Dan BAILLIE
Daniel BAILLIE was a private from Largs based in the 6th/7th Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers. He served in the South African war and was killed on June 18th 1916. Danile was buried in Bethune Town Cemetery, France. His service number was 16330.
 
Private James P. BALDIE
James BALDIE was born in Largs in approximately 1891, the son of John and Elizabeth Boyd BALDIE, later of Royal Bank House, Markinch, Fife. He served with the 14th battalion of the London regiment (London Scottish) and was killed on May 20th 1915, being subsequently buried in Netley Military Cemetery in Hampshire, England. James' service number was 3695.
 
Lt. John B. BALDIE
John Boyd BALDIE was born in Largs in approximately 1897, another son of John and Elizabeth Boyd BALDIE, later of Royal Bank House, Markinch, Fife. He served as a lieutenant in the Royal Air Force's 215 Squadron, and was killed in France on November 6th 1918, just five days short of the Armistice. John was buried in Charmes Military Cemetry, Essegney, France.
 
Private John H. BEGG
John BEGG was the son of the Reverend Robert Begg, B.D. of Cumberland House, John Street, Largs, born in approximately 1894. He fought with the 15th Battalion of the Highland Light Infantry and died on July 15th 1917. He was buried in Ramscappelle Road Military Cemetery in Belgium. John's service number was 31594.
 
Private Charles M. BEITH
Charles was the son of Peter and Susan BEITH, of Lovat Gardens in Largs, and was born in approximately 1890. He fought with the 1st Battalion of the Scots Guards and was killed early in the war, on January 25th 1915. Charles is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial in France.
 
Private Crawford BOYD
This Crawford BOYD is believed to have been a private in the 7th Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers killed on October 21st 1915, and commemorated on the Loos Memorial in France. His service number was 12760.
 
Private Andrew BRADLEY
Andrew BRADLEY was born in approximately 1881, the son of John and Annie Bradley. He fought with the 1st Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers, and was killed on September 20th 1914 in the opening salvoes of ther war, leaving behind his wife Elizabeth Bradley, of 3 William Street, Port Glasgow.  Andrew was buried in Le Mans West Cemetery in France. His service number was 7376.
 
Lt. J. F. CAMPBELL
John Fyshe CAMPBELL was born in approximately 1889 to John and Annabella CAMPBELL, of 42 Boyd Street, Largs. He fought with the 8th Battalion of the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders as second lieutenant, and was killed on April 10th 1917. John was buried in the Aubigny Communal Cemetry Extension in France.
 
Private Robert B. CAMPBELL
Robert Burns CAMPBELL was the son of Robert and Marion Campbell, of Mossgiel in Largs, born in approximately 1899. He fought with the 9th Company of the Machine Gun Corps (Infantry) and was killed on April 26th 1918 in the Ypres Salient. Robert is commemorated in the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium. His service number was 132127.
 
Private Patrick CAULFIELD
Patrick CAULFIELD was the son of John and B. CAULFIELD, of Coolroe, County Wexford, Ireland, and was born in approximately 1880. he fought with the 7th Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers, and was killed on September 26th 1915. Patrick was survived by his wife Mary Dougan CAULFIELD of 18 Wilson Street in Largs, and was commemorated on the Loos Memorial in France.
 
Private Robert M. COOK
Robert McKenzie COOK was of Canadian nationality, the son of James Cook, of Tron Place, Largs, born in approximately 1881. He fought with the Canadian Infantry (Quebec Regiment) and was killed on June 18th 1916. Robert is further commemorated on the Menin Gate Memorial to the fallen of Ypres. His service number was 171060.
 
Private William COUPER
William COUPER was the son of David and Jessie Couper of Largs, and born in approximately 1885. he fought with B Company, 1st/5th Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers, and was killed at Gallipoli on July 13th 1915. William is commemorated on the Helles Memorial in Turkey. His service number was 7697.
 


2nd Lt. James Crawford

2nd Lt. James CRAWFORD
James CRAWFORD was born in approximately 1888, the son of Greenock based solicitor John Wilson CRAWFORD and Jenny Charlotte Rennie CRAWFORD of Kelburn, Largs.
 
Before the war James studied at Glasgow University where he was awarded an M.A. and LL.B.
 
James fought with the 7th Battalion of the Cameron Highlanders and was killed on July 19th 1916, being subsequently buried in Bethune Town Cemetery in France. 
 
James is also commemorated on the University of Glasgow Roll of Honour.
 
 
Private Alexander CRUICKSHANK
Alexander CRUICKSHANK was born in Aberdeen in approximately 1899, the son of David and Jane CRUICKSHANK, later of 3 Spencer Buildings, Largs. Alexander fought with the 10th Battalion of the Scottish Rifles (Cameronians), and was killed on March 28th 1918. He was buried in Tilloy British Cemetery in Tilloy-les-Mofflaines, France. Alexander's service number was 38324.
 
Gunner George A. CUTHBERTSON
George Andrew CUTHBERTSON was born in approximately 1893, the son of Andrew and Margaret CUTHBERTSON of 3 John Clark Street, Largs. George fought with the 4th Highland Brigade of the Royal Garrison Artillery, and was killed on June 28th 1915 at Gallipoli. George is further commemorated at the Helles Memorial in Turkey, and his service number was 2223.
 
Sergeant George DICK
George DICK was a Canadian soldier born in approximately 1889, the son of John and Anna DICK, later of Netherall, Largs. George fought for the 1st Battalion of the Newfoundland Regimnent, and was killed on July 12th 1916. He is buried in Largs Cemetery, and his service number was 924.
 
Lance Corporal Harry DOCHERTY
 
 
Private Robert DOCHERTY
 
 
Lt. C. T. L. DONALDSON
Cleweth Thomas Lee DONALDSON was the son of Archibald Falconer DONALDSON and Jane Giliebrand Lee DONALDSON, born in approximately 1897. He flew with the Royal Flying Corp's 52nd Squadron and the Glasgow Yeomanry (Queen's Own Royal), and was killed on April 14th 1917. Cleweth was buried in the Metz-en-Couture Communal Cemetery British Extension in France.
 
Private Thomas EASSON
Thomas EASSON was the son of John EASSON and Margaret HIGGINS, born in approximately 1876. He fought with the 1st/4th Battlion of the Royal Scots Fusliers and was killed on December 14th 1915. He was buried in Largs Cemetry and was survived by his wife Christina WOOD. Thomas' service number was 7966.
 
Private Alexander ERSKINE
 
 
Able Seaman John FIGGINS
John C. FIGGINS was the son of David and Annie Campbell FIGGINS, and was born in approximately 1893. he served with the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve's Howe Battalion R. N. Division, and was killed on September 18th 1918. John was buried in Largs Cemetery. His service number was Clyde Z/7103.
 
Private John B. FRAZER
John Brown FRAZER was the son of Archibald and Agnes FRAZER of Largs, Ayrshire, and was bor in approximately 1880. He fought with the 9th (Glasgow Highlanders) Battalion of the Highland Light Infantry, and was killed on September 27th 1918. John was buried in Villers Hill British Cemetery, Villers-Guslain, France, and was survived by his wife, Johanna Kennedy FRAZER, of 87 Overdale Street, Langside, Glasgow. His service number was 333110.
 
Private CONN GALLACHER
Connel GALLACHER was the son of James and Annie Connolly GALLACHER, of 19 New Street, Largs, and was born in approximately 1896. He fought with "C" Company 9th Battalion of the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders), and was killed on September 25th 1915. Conn is further commemorated on the Loos Memorial in France, and his service number was S/6627.
 
In October 2007, the following information and photograph of Conn was obtained from his niece's husband, Hugh Maxwell, for which I am indebted:

gallacher.jpg

Connel (Conn) Gallacher was born on 10 March 1896, at 25 New Street, Largs, fourth in the family of eleven children.

His parents were James Gallacher (Largs) and Annie Connelly (Bonhill), who emigrated to the USA in April 1891 and married in S. Boston in November 1892. Their first two children were born in USA and they had settled back in Largs by the time Conn was born. Conn's grandfather, Con Gallacher, was the last toll-keeper at the Noddle Bridge on the Greenock Road.

Conn enlisted at Ayr and joined the 9th Service Battalion of the Black Watch. His service number was S/6627.

His father died in November 1913, and we know from family how distraught his mother was when he came home and announced that he had enlisted. They felt that this and his death soon after affected her life until her death of fever in September 1916.

Conn was killed on the first day of the battle of Loos, 25 September 1915. He was one of the many whose bodies were not found, but he is commemorated on panel 41 of the British Memorial which is situated in the country, near Loos-en-Gohelle, on route N43 between Lens and Bethune in northern France.

His death was recorded in The Largs & Millport Weekly News on 6 January 1917.
 
 

MEMORIAL PLAQUE No. 2
 
(North facing)
 

 

Private Andrew GALLOWAY
Andrew GALLOWAY was the son of Robert and Janet Dickie Galloway, of 591 Alexandra Parade, Dennistoun, Glasgow, born in Largs in approximately 1895. He fought with "A" Company of the 9th (Glasgow Highlanders) Battalion of the Highland Light Infantry, and was killed on July 15th 1916. Andrew was buried in Delville Wood Cemetery. His service number was 2134.
 
2nd Lieutenant A. S. F. GOURLAY
Alexander Smith Forrest GOURLAY was a second lieutenant with the 2nd and 3rd Battalions of the Scottish Rifles (Cameronian). He was killed on March 24th 1918 and is commemorated on the Pozieres Memorial in France. An obituary on him appeared in the Glasgow Evening Times on September 11th 1918 (p.3) and included his portrait.
 
Driver J. M. GRAHAM
 
 
Driver James HYSLOP
 
 
Corporal Robert HOPKINS
 
 
Able Seaman John HUNTER
 
 
Private Robert HUNTER
 
 
Private Andrew HUTCHINSON
 
 
Sergeant A. D. JAMIESON
Archibald Dow JAMIESON was the son of Mrs. Jessie JAMIESON, of 3 Kelvin Street, Largs, and born in approximately 1892. He fought with the 10th Battalion of the Gordon Highlanders and as a lance-sergeant was killed on May 25th 1915. Archibald was subsequently commemorated on the Loos Memorial in France. His service number was S/5374.
 
Gunner A. J. JAMIESON
A. J. JAMIESON was the husband of Margaret JAMIESON (later GILLAN) of 11 Esplanade, Largs. He was born in approximately 1887 and was killed on December 3rd 1916, as a gunner fighting for the Royal Garrison Artillery. His service number was 6288.
 
Private Archie JOHNSTONE
 
 
Private James KELSO
 
 
Private William KING
 
 
Private W. G. LAMB
William G. LAMB was the son of John and Jane LAMB, of 79 Gateside Street, Largs, born in approximately 1889. He fought with the 7th Battalion of the Cameron Highlanders, and was killed on June 28th 1916. William was subsequently buried in Bois-Carre Military Cemetery, in Haisnes, France. William's service number was S/13773.
 
Gunner John MARTIN
Gunner Martin was taken prisoner and interned in a POW camp in Germany, where he died from malnutrition in 1918. Many thanks to John's great nephew Gerald Martin for supplying this information in September 2007.
 
Private Edward MARTINDALE
Edward MARTINDALE was the son of William MARTINDALE of 6 Morris Street, Largs, and was born in approximately 1899. He fought with the 6th Battalion of the Cameron Highlanders and was killed on March 22nd 1918. Edward was subsequently buried in the Faubourg D'Amiens Cemetery at Arras, France. His service number was S/40655.
 
Private W. MIDDLETON
William MIDDLETON was the husband of Elizabeth MIDDLETON of 23 Waterside Street, Largs, and was born in approximately 1889. he fought with the 2nd Infantry Labour Company of the Seaforth Highlanders, and was killed on January 9th 1918. William was buried at Duhallow A.D.S. Cemetery in Belgium. His service number was S/19211. An obituary on William appeared in the Glasgow Evening Times on May 23rd 1918 (p.4) and included a portrait of him).
 
Sapper W. MORRIS
William Johnstone MORRIS was the son of Mr. and Mrs. John MORRIS, of 20 Fraser's Close, Largs, and was born in approximately 1879. He worked as a sapper (miner) for 108th Field Company of the Royal Engineers, and was killed on August 18th 1916.. William was buried at Karasouli Military Cemetery in Greece. His service number was 63294.
 
Private Adam MOODIE
 
 
Lieutenant Glen O. MacANDREW
 
 
2nd Engineer John M. McARTHUR
John Main MacARTHUR was the son of Jamieson and Agnes Main MacARTHUR, the husband of Mary McKINLAY, of 8 Lorn Street, Glasgow, and was born in Largs in approximately1882. John was a second engineer with the Mercantile Marine regiment, serving with the S.S. Dartmoor. He was killed on May 17th 1917. John was subsequently commemorated on the Tower Hill Memorial in London.
 
Private John T. McARTHUR
John Todd McARTHUR was the son of William and Annie McARTHUR, of 12 Aitken Street, Largs, and was born in approximately 1897. he fought with the 6th Battalion of the King's Own Scottish Borderers, and was killed on April 25th 1918. John is commemorated on the Tyne Cot Memorial in Belgium. His service number was 31118.
 
2nd Lieutenant George C. MacDONALD
George Cockburn MacDONALD was the only son of Malcolm and Agnes Cockburn MacDONALD, of "Dunraven," Largs, and was born in approximately 1895. He fought with the 5th battalion of the Highland Light Infantry, and died on November 17th 1918, six days after the Armistice was declared. George is buried in Largs Cemetery.
 
Lance Corporal George J. S. MacDONALD
 
 
Private Dan McGHIE
 
 
Gunner George McGOWAN
 
 


Lance Corporal Wylie Robert McIntyre

Lance Corporal Wylie R. McINTYRE
Wylie Robert McINTYRE fought with the 7th Battalion of the Cameron Highlanders, 51st Division, and was killed on September 25th 1915 at Loos in France. He is commemorated on the Loos Memorial in France.
 
Prior to the war Wylie studied at the University of Glasgow, where he was awarded a BL, and as such he is commemorated on their online Roll of Honour.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

MEMORIAL PLAQUE No. 3
 
(West facing)
 

 
 
Private J. L. McINTYRE
James Lennie McINTYRE was the son of Hugh and Jane McINTYRE, of Quarter Farm, Largs, and was born in approximately 1889. James enlisted in the 17th Battallion of the Highland Light Infantry in January 1915, and at some stage transferred to the 10th Battalion of the Royal Fusiliers, where he served as a second lieutenant, not as a private. He was killed on May 14th 1918, and was buried at St. Sever Cemetery, Rouen, France.
 
 
Private Angus McINNES
 
 
Lance Corporal Archd. McKAY
 
 
Gunner R. D. McKENZIE
 
 
Trooper Jack McKENZIE
 
 
Corporal of Horse Peter MACKIE
 
 
Private Thomas McKIRDY
 
 
Private A. A. McLACHLAN
Archibald Angus MacCalman MacLACHLAN was the son of Donald and Margaret MacLACHLAN, of Crawfordlea, Largs, and was born in approxmately 1891. Archibald fought with "D" Company 8th Battalion of the Seaforth Highlanders, and was killed on August 17th 1916. he is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial in France. Archibald's service number was S/6374.  
 
Gunner Alex McLEAN
Alex McLEAN was the son of Mr D. McLean, of Wood Cottage, Ullapool, Ross-shire, the husband of Mary McLean, of 108 Main Street, Largs, and was born in approximately 1894. He fought with "A" Battery 82nd Brigade of the Royal Field Artillery, and was killed June 18th 1918. Alex was buried in Plaine French National Cemetery, France. His service number was 220148.
 
Private James S. McLEAN
James McLEAN was the son of Adam McLEAN, of Irvine Place, 71 Nelson Street, Largs, and was born in approximately 1883. He fought with the 1st/5th Battalion of the Royal Scots Fusiliers, and was killed on September 19th 1918. James is commemorated on the Vis-En-Artois Memorial in France, and his service number was 203662.
 
Sapper Stewart McPHADEN
Stewart McPHADEN was the son of Isabella McPHADEN, of 5 Gallowhill Place, Largs, and was born in approximately 1899. He fought with the 4th Field Survey Company of the Royal Engineers, and was killed on April 17th 1918. Stewart was buried in Abeele Aerodrome Military Cemetery, belgium. His service number was 358902.
 
Private James O' DONNELL
 
 
2nd Lieutenant A. J. ORR
 
 
Captain G. L. PAGAN
Gavin Laing PAGAN was a captain with the 15th Battalion of the Royal Scots, and was killed on April 28th 1917.  He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial in France.
 
Gavin was in fact a Church of Scotland minister, who came from a Borders family originally, although he himself was born in Bothwell.  He was minister of Largs for 7 years, although had been in Edinburgh for 5 years when he joined up at the age of 41, in the midst of debate in the church as to whether ministers should be combatants.
 
Gavin's cousin Lora McGinlay very kindly submitted me with some of her research on Gavin in July 2008, for which I am very grateful.
 
The following obituary for Gavin appeared in the Scotsman on June 19th 1917:
THE LATE CAPTAIN GAVIN PAGAN
 
We deeply regret to announce that, according to information received through the Red Cross Society of Geneve, Captain, the Rev. G. L. Pagan, minister of St. George's Edinburgh, was killed in action on 28th April last. He led his company in one of the local engagements which took place in the advance against the Hindenberg Line, and his detachment was seen to reach its objective, and to begin entrenching  in the face of a powerful German counter-attack. The hope that he might have survived has been dispelled by the message from one of his subalterns now a prisoner of war in Germany, that he was shot through the head and killed.
 
Gavin laing Pagan was born in 1873 in the Manse of Bothwell. His father, Dr. John Pagan, was Moderator of the General Assembly in 1883. His mother was a member of the gifted family which, besides gaining laurels in other fields, was to supply a Principal to the University of Aberdeen, and, in the next generation, an Archbishop to the See of York. After his schooling at Hamilton Academy, he proceeded to Glasgow University, where he had a distinguished record, graduating with first class honours in Philosophy. His great abilities marked him out for rapid promotion, and as a fact within ten years after his ordination he had reached one of the highest positions which the Church of Scotland has to offer. In 1889 he was called to Callander; three years later he was translated to Largs; and in 1909 he became minister of the Edinburgh congregation which had attained so great prosperity under the pastoral care of Dr. Archibald Scott. Before coming to St. George's he was sent out for a year to India, and helped to build up the church in Simla, which to the Anglo-Indian community is a prominent symbol of the life and work of the Church of Scotland. In each of these spheres he won abounding respect and affection. In character he was singularly unassuming and self-forgetting, loyal and kind-hearted, and, above all, he wa sone of the most sincere and straightforward of men, and in a matter of principle one of the most unbending. His sermons were thoughtful and scholarly, with the saving grace of spirituality and sympathy; and while primarily lucid and robust, they were in perfect taste in the matter of form and expression. He performed his pastoral duties with a painstaking fidelity and a minute conscientiousness which were made easy for him by his genuine interest in the wants and afflictions of others. he visited his whole congregation faithfully, but his memory will specially abide in fragrance in those gloomy streets and lanes, tenanted by poor and infirm folk, which have yielded up so many husbands and brothers and sons to travel with him to the sacrifice.
 
In the early months of the war Mr Pagan preached some powerful sermons, in which he expounded the issues which were at stake, and enforced the appeal of the hour for recruits. In pointing out to others their duty, he was compelled by his native honesty to ask himself if it was not also his own duty. There were sufficient reasons why he should have thought himelf exempt from the call. The Church of England had declared it unlawful for her clergy to join the army as combatants, and the Courts of the Church of Scotland had as yet made no sign. It was arguable that St. george's had the first claim on him for his spiritual service. He was past military age. But he came to the conclusion that in the conflict of dutiers the military need of the nation was decisive, and he held unfalteringly to his decision. In his last sermon in St. George's he announced his decision in simple and strong words:-
 
"Our country is in a position of extreme danger. The enemy is still at a distance, and he is being held in check by the splendid efforts of our Fleets and Armies, joined to those of our gallant Allies. But the struggle is still undecided. The call for men to fill the places of those who have been struck down, and to form new regiments for the battle , is till being sounded. I feel that I cannot remain any longer here. I can serve you better by joining the Army. We must win this war, and win it at a distance, if our country is not to be swept from end to end, and reduced to ruins, like Belgium and France. I can see no way which this calamity can be averted except that the able-bodied manhood of the country should rally to the flag and beat back the aggressor. There will not be a man worthy of the name who will not wish that he were able to take part in the struggle. If I have claimed this great privilege, I beg you to bear with me, and to wish me strength for such honourable service."
 
The chief difficulty, curiously enough, was raised, not by the congregation or by the Presbytery, but by the Army authorities. As a chaplain, Mr pagan had held the rank of an officer, and the regulations, it appeared, forbade him to enlist as a common soldier. But this obstacle also was finally overcome by his dour determination, and he was enrolled as a matter of grace as a private in a famous battalion of the Royal Scots. In due course, he received a commission, and went out to France, where he was soon gazetted Captain. He had experience of mortars and machine guns in the trench fighting, and later on he was utilised as an instructor at the Base, where many of the newly arrived contingents passed through his hands. Hhe was engaged in this work at the time of the Somme offensive. Speaking of his being temporarily "lent" for instruction, a wouldn';t soldier remarked, "It wasna' his wish, but dootless the Colonel thocht him ower guid a man to be killed." Another glimpse of him was got from a letter in the Spectator, in which a correspondent took the Church of England to task in the light of Mr Pagan's example and influence.
 
"The argument about the needs of wounded souls at home leaves me cold. I know what the front is like. I have been there; and it is  the trenches that hep and inspiration are needed most, even if there was not at home an adequate number of old and elderly ecclesiastics. A clergyman does not diminish his usefulness tenfold. I know at the front a minister of the Church of Scotland - a cousion, by the way, of an Anglican Archbishop, who had enlisted as a private. he was a Lieutenant when I came across him; and by the universal testimony of officers and men his walk and conversation had exercised immense influence for good in his battalion."
 
Captain Pagan was on leave at Christmas, and gave in St. George's a short address, in which, while speaking with his customary caution of the difficulties of our task, he also struck the characteristic note of unflinching resolution. For some time before this he had rejoined his regiment in the fighting area. There recently appeared in the Scotsman a letter from a chaplain, who drew a vivid picture of the movements of his Company, of which he was now in command, on the eve of the Arras offensive. A wounded soldier, who has been brought back to a Scottish hospital, has given interesting details of his last fight, of the wood through which they marched near a famous stream, and of the village near to which he fell. He has also preserved his last sermon, preached to the men before they went over the parapet. "We don't know men, what will happen; but take this with you. '"Lo! I am with you always, even unto the end of the world.' " He has made to seem still truer the true words which were spoken in his last sermon in St. George's:-
 
"This is a stern business. The shadow of grief is spreading over the land and darkening many a home. But we are reaching to a new joy through this agony. We are learning a new pride in our country and Empire, and a new affection and loyalty to one another."
 
Captain Pagan leaves a widow, the only daughter of Gordon Douglas, manager of the Life Association of Scotland.
 
Additional newspaper articles on Gavin Pagan are as follows:
Glasgow University (preliminary examination in arts)
The Glasgow Herald 6 NOV 1889 p.4
 
University of Glasgow: List of Degrees Conferred in the various Faculties of the University  on 21st April 1893 - Higher Moral Philosophy Class
The Glasgow Herald 22 APR 1893 p. 4
 
University of Glasgow - Scholarships, Bursaries &c.
The Glasgow Herald 26 JAN 1894 p. 4
 
Glasgow University Missionary Society
The Glasgow Herald 15 MAY 1894 p. 4
 
Glasgow University Union
The Glasgow Herald 21 MAR 1895 p. 6
 
Barony Church
The Glasgow Herald 31 MAR 1896 p. 9
 
Ecclesiastical (appointment to Aberdeen)
The Glasgow Herald 16 JUN 1897 p. 9
 
Untitled
Aberdeen Weekly Journal 16 SEP 1898 p. 4
 
Untitled
Aberdeen Weekly Journal 21 DEC 1898 p. 5
 
Church Notes of the Past Week
Untitled
Aberdeen Weekly Journal 19 APR 1899 p. 6
 
Sunday Services in St. Giles
Glasgow Herald 20 MAY 1899 p. 9
 
Church Notes of the Past Week
Untitled
Aberdeen Weekly Journal 5 JUL 1899 p. 6
 
Callander Parish Church Vacant
Glasgow Herald 18 JUL 1899 p. 8
 
Church Notes of the Past Week
Untitled
Aberdeen Weekly Journal 26 JUL 1899 p. 6
 
Church Notes of the Past Week
Untitled
Aberdeen Weekly Journal 30 AUG 1899 p. 6
 
Callander Parish Church
Glasgow Herald 8 SEP 1899 p. 10
 
Anerdeen and Northern News
Aberdeen Weekly Journal 13 SEP 1899 p. 5
 
Church of Scotland's Young Men's Guild - The Conference in Aberdeen
Aberdeen Weekly Journal 25 OCT1899 p. 5
 
McLaren vs Pagan and Others (Court of Session)
Glasgow Herald 12 NOV 1900 p. 12
 
The New Armies - Edinburgh Minister Joining the Army - Parting Words to His Congregation
The Scotsman 2 NOV 1914 p.10
 
The Rev. Gavin Pagan, St. George's, Edinburgh - His Work with a Scottish Regiment in France
The Scotsman 8 JUN 1914 p. 4
 
Minister of St. George's to Join Kitchener's Army
The Scotsman 29 OCT 1914 p. 4
 
Untitled
The Scotsman 29 OCT 1914 p. 4
 
Marriage of the Rev. Gavin Laing Pagan, B.D.
The Scotsman 13 AUG 1915 p. 4
 
Further Leave of Absence to the Rev. Mr. Pagan
The Scotsman 30 SEP 1915 p. 8
 
The Rev. G. L. Pagan of St. George's, Edinburgh, Missing 
The Scotsman 4 MAY 1917 p. 4
 
Memorial Service for the Rev. Gavin. L. Pagan
The Scotsman 28 JUN 1917 p. 4
 
The Rev. Gavin Pagan - Official Announcement of His Death
The Scotsman 9 AUG 1917
Ecclesiastical - St. George's, Edinburgh - Presbytery's Tribute to the Rev. Mr. Pagan
The Scotsman 16 AUG 1917 p.3
 
 
Private William PATON
 
 
Private W. F. PURVES
 
 
Trooper Victor I. REID
 
 
Gunner James RIDDELL
James RIDDELL was the son of William and Mary RIDDELL of Stanlane Cottage, Largs, and was born in approximately 1892. He fought with the Argyll Mountain Battery of the Royal Garrison Artillery, and was killed on October 4th 1916. He is buried in Struma Military Cemetery in Greece. James' service number was 2263.
 
Corporal David RYBURN
David RYBURN was the son of Agnes Ryburn, of Seaview Cottage, Skelmorlie, and was born in Largs in approximately 1880. David was a lance corporal with the 1st (Royal) Dragoons and was killed on May 25th 1915. He was buried in Boulogne Eastern Cemetery in France. David's service number was 329.
 
Captain Geo. P. SIMPSON
George P. SIMPSON was the son of Robert and Margaret SIMPSON of Anderson Place, Largs, and was born in approximately 1883. he fought with the 10th battalion of the Scottish Rifles (Cameronians), and was killed on August 2nd 1918.
 
Lieutenant Ronald J. STEWART M.C.
Ronald James STEWART was the son of Thomas Cuthbert STEWART and Jessie M. STEWART of Blackhouse, Skelmorlie, and was born in approximately 1892. He was educated at Hazelwood School in Limpsfield Surrey leaving in the spring of 1906 for Wellington College where he was head of Mr Upcott’s House in 1909/10 and in October 1910 he went on to Trinity College Cambridge.
 
With the advent of war, Ronald fought with the 3rd Battalion of the Seaforth Highlanders, and was then attached to the 1st Battalion. He was wounded on January 13th 1916 and died in hospital at Amara, Mesopotamia, on January 28th 1916. He was subsequently buried at Amara War Cemetery (Plot I Row C Grave 24) in Iraq, and was awarded the Military Cross for bravery., and was also mentioned in despatches.
 
Many thanks to John Hamblin in Surrey, England, for his contribution to Ronald's entry in March 2008.
 
Corporal George STEWART
 
 
Corporal Archd. B. THOMSON
Archibald Barr THOMSON was the son of Mr. and Mrs. James Thomson of St. Catherines, Ontario, and was born in Ayrshire in approximately 1897. He fought with the 4th Canadian Mounted Rifles (Central Ontario Regiment), and died on November 30th 1918, just a couple of weeks after the Armistice. He was buried in Valenciennes (St. Rch) Communal Cemetery in France. Archibald's service number was 158693.
 
A photo of Archibald's grave can be viewed online at the VAC Canada Remembers website.
 
Sergeant George W. WALKER
 
 
Private F. WARMAN
Frederick WARMAN was the husband of Ellen WARMAN of 9 Lade Street, Largs, with whom he had three children. Frederick was born in Street, Somerset, England. He fought with the 2nd Pioneers of the Australian Infantry A. I. F., and was killed on October 5th 1918. He is commemorated on the Villers-Brettoneux Memorial in France.  Fred's service number was 3667.
 
Frederick had three brothers, Sydney, William and Albert, and a sister called Sarah. His father was John WARMAN (born 1838, Walton) and his mother called Mary.
Private Joseph WATSON
Joseph WATSON was the son of John and Helen WATSON of Bedford Cottage, Largs, and was born in approximately 1882. He fought with "C" Company 17th Battalion of the Highland Light Infantry, and was killed on July 1st 1916. Joseph was buried at Serre Road Cemetery No. 2 in France. His service number was 2688.
 
Able Seaman Neil WATSON
 
 
Private John B. WEIR
John Bryce WEIR was the son of James and Elizabeth Weir, and was born at Largs in approximately 1877. He fought with the 16th Battalion of the Australian Infantry A. I. F., and was killed on July 4th 1918. John was subsequently buried in Villers-Brettoneux Military Cemetery, France. His service number was 4937.
 
Private Crawford WILSON
Crawford WILSON was the son of Alexander Simpson WILSON and Agnes Welch WILSON of Largs, and was born in approximately 1893. he fought with the 5th Battalion of the Cameron Highlanders and was killed on July 17th 1916. he was subsequently buried at La Neuville British Cemetery, Corbie, France. His service number was 16623.
 
 
 

 
Sources
 
Commonwealth War Graves Commission
 
Glasgow Evening Times Roll of Honour
 
Rootsweb
 
University of Glasgow Roll of Honour
 
Veteran Affairs Canada Remembers
 

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SCOTLAND'S
Greatest Story

Chris Paton, BA (Hons), HND, PGD (Genealogical Studies)
22 Lindsay Crescent, Largs, North Ayrshire, Scotland, KA30 9JR

Tel: 0044 1475 674118
Mob/Cell: 0044 7941 118183
 
E-mail:

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